Supertest: CS-63 Initial Stats

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Today, a representative of the new Polish branch, the CS-63, will try to make it through the closed Supertest.

This Tier X medium has promising characteristics! Let’s take a closer look.

It’s armed with a 105 mm gun delivering an alpha damage of 390 points. A standard AP round can penetrate 258 mm of enemy armor, while a special APCR can go through 315 mm. In 8.5 seconds, the gun is reloaded enabling you to cause even more damage. As for other parameters, the dispersion and the aiming times are 0.36 at 100 m and 2.3 seconds, respectively. Also, the gun sports decent stabilization values and the vehicle has a view range of 400 m.

Armor-wise, it’s quite an ordinary vehicle: its front armor plates are 260 mm thick, but mainly in the gun mask, while other areas have less protection. The hull’s protection is even weaker: 80 mm in the front, however the armor plates are well-angled. Overall, the Pole’s hit points amount to 2000.

The best thing about the CS-63 is its mobility. The tank can move in two modes: standard and rapid. Switching between them causes dramatic changes in the vehicle’s dynamic characteristics. In standard mode, the maximum speed is 55 km/h, while when put in rapid mode, the Pole can hit 70 km/h. Also, with rapid mode on, its engine reveals a whopping increase in power: from the standard 740 hp up to 1150 hp. While the dynamics increase in rapid mode, the performance of the gun suffers (the stabilization and the aiming time values decrease significantly) and the vehicle becomes more visible.

It should be noted that the impact produced by switching between modes is far from set in stone, and both the numerical values ​​and the characteristics might change.

To Sum it up, the CS-63 is a classic medium tank. It has a decent gun, mounted on a flexible, yet poorly armored platform. However, putting the Pole in rapid mode allows for a much wider area of control over the map and expands the range of tactical options. In skillful hands this vehicle can perform to the utmost of its abilities.

12 thoughts on “Supertest: CS-63 Initial Stats

  1. Why would a commie Pole tank, “designed” in 1963 judging from it’s name, use a NATO 105 mm gun?

    1. It doesn’t specify that it’s a NATO gun, it could just be an original design of the then-typical 105mm. Besides, that gun looks Russian to me, like the T-54 D-10T gun.

      1. That the 105mm was popular is true, but the warsaw pact did not use this caliber.

        The 105mm Royal Ordinance L7, which by far is the THE tank gun of the 50s, 60s, 70s for NATO, was a British design, the Soviet Union did not need to copy it, since they

        A) didn’t get samples until 1967 in the six day war
        B) The socialist tank design had a different philosophy in that they had weapons specifically tailored for t-54/55 (100mm gun as seen in game) and later the 115mm gun on t-62, which were perfect advesaries or even superior weapons in comparison to the L7.

        So it would not make any sense for Poland to use a derivative of a 105mm made by Britain, since the usual Calibres where 100mm, 115mm and 125 mm in the warsaw pact. And I think licence acquisition is also difficult when the buyer is an ideological adversary…

        Introducing a caliber which your enemy uses, but your own troops and allies didn’t, does not make sense after all.

        This move from WeeGee is unreasonable and unhistoric.

    2. Polish military intelligence brought to Poland for testing machines acquired by Korean and Vietnamese communists during the Korean and Vietnam War. A report from the CIA of 1952 mentions this. https://www.cia.gov/library/readingroom/docs/CIA-RDP82-00457R014500130001-0.pdf
      From the same period is M48A3 which is in the collection of the museum in Kubinka – https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ad/M48A3_Patton_III_–Kubinka_Tank_Museum%2837243469384%29.jpg/800px-M48A3_Patton_III_–Kubinka_Tank_Museum%2837243469384%29.jpg
      M107 at the Museum of Polish Military Technology – http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-NLRmy57FBJ8/VUEzjK4VoAI/AAAAAAAAKY0/mG1tko0tDCg/s1600/1.jpg

      1. Thanks for this information but like Communism_is_victorious already said, it makes no sense to use a different caliber ammunition than what all your allies were using at the time.

    1. The WZ-132-1 is feasible in a sense, that the People’s Republic of China did had a warming in relations with the US after 1972, it was not part of the soviet block since the sino-soviet split in 1966, thus is had the blessing of the USA to import western military equipment. There was even a proposed joint Sino-us MBT envisioned.
      Thus, as the Chinese lacked behind in Military deveopment due to the disruption nmed lutural revolution, the idea of importing western equipment to improve domestic units is not quit dumb.

      Later on the chinese utilized this experience by creating Type 69, Type 79 and the Type 15, which all use a derivative of the L7. The reason is, like I said, the lacking euqipment due to mismanagement.

      Poland on the other hand was entirely dependent on the Soviet Union, thus exposed to sviet military and ideological doctrine. Chruschev would be alarmed if Poland would plan to import western equipment. In fact Soviet client states only got older soviet military tech and all those PL CZ tanks never ever where produced, instead opting for T-34-85 and T-72

      China had many options how to gain equipment, since the could free themselves from soviet control.

      1. HOOOOWH stop my friend right here!!! Learn what tanks were built in Slovakia (Martin – t34/85, t54, t55, t72, our special modifications, armored fighting vehicles, artilery) and Poland. In 80″ had Czechoslovakia more tanks then USA, it was a tank empire (thats a fact, no imagination!), OUR tanks were exported to Líbyi, Sýria, Libanon, India, Pakistan, Irán, Nigeria, Hungary, Romania, India, Maroko, Egypt NDR, Yugoslavia, Latin America and elsewhere, still in service today… They were superior to the Soviet originals. CS republic was to 89 weapon empire, so make your info right! no offense

  2. The WZ-132-1 is feasible in a sense, that the People’s Republic of China did had a warming in relations with the US after 1972, it was not part of the soviet block since the sino-soviet split in 1966, thus is had the blessing of the USA to import western military equipment. There was even a proposed joint Sino-us MBT envisioned.
    Thus, as the Chinese lacked behind in Military deveopment due to the disruption nmed lutural revolution, the idea of importing western equipment to improve domestic units is not quit dumb.

    Later on the chinese utilized this experience by creating Type 69, Type 79 and the Type 15, which all use a derivative of the L7. The reason is, like I said, the lacking euqipment due to mismanagement.

    Poland on the other hand was entirely dependent on the Soviet Union, thus exposed to sviet military and ideological doctrine. Chruschev would be alarmed if Poland would plan to import western equipment. In fact Soviet client states only got older soviet military tech and all those PL CZ tanks never ever where produced, instead opting for T-34-85 and T-72

    China had many options how to gain equipment, since the could free themselves from soviet control.

    1. If we assume some historycy to the caliber choice then there is one possibility i could think of: If the tank design was still in a very early stage a specific weapon might not have been chosen yet and instead only a rough specification of an L7 gun equivalent existed – just to give a sense of direction where the tank design would fit in comparison to its possible adversaries.

  3. And the 121 will be buffed to compete with its replacement?

    Speaking of, the AMX 30B never got its promised buffs in 1.5.1, either. It sorely needs them.

    1. Totally agree, amx30b should get 420 of view range, 315 or 320 of heat penn. and a little more of engine power like to get 25 hp/tones
      At least that i would make to him to get some difference from other mediums, it should be a semi light

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